Walking through History at the Camino del Santiago

 

Camino de Santiago, a UNESCO World Heritage Site Image: whc.unesco.org

Camino de Santiago, a UNESCO World Heritage Site
Image: whc.unesco.org

J. Christopher “Chris” Llinas, the corporate counsel of Royal Plus, Inc., enjoys eco-tourism. In 2015, Chris Llinas went to Spain and hiked the last 100 kilometers of the Camino del Santiago, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The Camino de Santiago, or the Way of St. James, makes up an ancient pilgrim route that spreads through Europe. This 500-mile network of routes spreads from France to Portugal to Spain and unites in northwest Spain, where pilgrims see the tomb of Saint James.

The routes developed throughout the Middle Ages, when people would walk from wherever they lived to Santiago. In 814, explorers found the tomb of Saint John. Since then, it has been a popular destination. Over time, Romans established routes to guide pilgrims. Churches, hospitals, towns, abbeys, and monasteries soon grew alongside the routes. The pilgrimage gradually declined in the 1300s due to wars and epidemics.

Today, airplanes make it much easier to make the pilgrimage. While travelers go to Camino for various reasons, whether for tourism or spirituality, the pilgrim routes offer interesting monasteries, churches, cathedrals, and more.

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